Edward and Marguerite

From EastKingdomWiki

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(Poetry)
("King Konrad Hears Evening Song")
Line 93: Line 93:
===''"King Konrad Hears Evening Song"''===   
===''"King Konrad Hears Evening Song"''===   
-
Commissioned by HRH Edward.  For text see [[Konrad II and Brenwen II]].
+
Commissioned by HRH Edward.  For text see [[Konrad II and Brenwen II#King Konrad Hears Evening Song|Konrad II and Brenwen II]].
===''"The Rose of Courtesy"''===
===''"The Rose of Courtesy"''===

Revision as of 21:25, 29 September 2010

Photo

Photo by Aethan of Lochleven
Information
King:Edward Grey of Lochleven
Queen:Marguerite Ingen Lachlainn
East Kingdom Crown #:85
Preceded by:Konrad II and Brenwen II
Succeeded by:

Contents

Accomplishments

Hosted Pennsic XXXIX. Won Pennsic XXXIX.

Staff

Champions

Poetry

"In Praise of Sir Edward Grey of Lochleven"

Performed at King & Queen's Bardic Competition 2010

These sage monarchs our fates secure.
Clearly seeing the conflict cruel,
called for strong heirs to lead through strife.
Stood through trial to test their might.

Those full of hope all came to field.
Favored consorts with constant hearts
held their vigil through fateful bouts
between brothers who'd fight to rule.

One in scarlet, his valor true,
took the listfield and yielded not.
New prince arose -- Edward mighty.
Marguerite shone with regal grace.

In August's fire they'll march to war,
watchful for sign of dragon's charge.
Champion fierce will bravely strike --
steady as stone in face of storm.

But Edward calls for warriors bold --
brothers in arms to stand and fight.
Fleeing never in face of strife.
Stand all Tygers and glory claim.

-- © 2009 Amanda Lord (known in the society as Aoife inghean Conchobair) Written for HRH Edward's victory in Crown Tournament

"King Konrad Hears Evening Song"

Commissioned by HRH Edward. For text see Konrad II and Brenwen II.

"The Rose of Courtesy"

Commissioned by HRH Marguerite for then HRM Brenwen's Coronet. For the text see Konrad II and Brenwen II.


"Rise to be more than men"

Cuchulain stood small but fierce,
facing howling horde of men.
Meanwhile ailed Ulster's kin –
kingdom stricken sick with pain.

Cursed by goddess, tired, bruised.
Beardless hero stood alone.
Lugh's son held back armies great,
Glory gained by guarding home.

Like bold hero we face horde –
host of foes, our numbers few.
Fame's ransom – cold coin of blood.
Bold men braving flame of war.

Facing swarm of dragon's teeth,
Tyger's bright blood burns in hearts.
Hear hard truth of battle red,
and rise to be more than men.

-- © 2010 Amanda Lord (known in the society as Aoife inghean Conchobair) Written as a piece to inspire the East Kingdom Fighters before Pennsic.

"Ceinwensflokkr" ("Ceinwen's Short Poem")

Middle Kingdom monarchs
mead of Hár I offer – [Hár = Odin, his mead = Poetry]
Meter, gift of mighty
Marguerite of East-Realm.
Tigress Queen bequests this
coin of Egil’s ransom [Egil bought his life with a poem]
praising Rose who rules the [Queen]
regal white and scarlet.

Daughter of two dragons
drake of red she hails from [Wales’ national flag has a red dragon]
harm befell the high-born,
hills of Wales she left then. [From her bio on her reign page]
Different drake defends her
doughty, strong and green-hued,
crown of Middle Kingdom
crests her birth of wisdom. [Head]

Able is this elm of [elm = woman-
arm fire, quick of hand she [arm-fire = gold]
deft adorns fine scrolls with
drawings of great beauty,
finer still she fashions
feasts delighting all from
kings to common folk with
cooking full of savor.

Hail to kindest Ceinwen,
Queen of Middle Kingdom!
Tireless, true, deep-minded,
determined in service. [Ceinwen’s virtue in the Sisterhood of the Gilded Bee]
Festive, fair-voiced singer
friend of bards she’s proven
In return I offer
Odin’s theft for word-fame [Odin’s-theft = poetry]
-- © 2010 Dan Marsh (known in the society as Grim the Skald) Performed for Queen Ceinwen of the Middle Kingdom at the East & Middle Kingdom Bardic Circle at Pennsic 39. Written as a flokkr (a "flock" of verses, as opposed to a long poem,) in the Norse style Formless Drottkvaett.

"Vairavi's Poem"

Peacocks do not fly in vast flocks,
nor do tigers crowd the forest.
Gold does not lie scattered on the ground;
pearls are not strewn on the sea-bed;
laurel leaves do not cover sides of mountains.
Kabir says: the ascetic walks along the road alone
a spiritual person is rare in this world.
-- Other than the last two lines, © 2010 Dan Marsh (known in the society as Grim the Skald) Performed for Vairavi's Laureling ceremony. Written in the style of Kabir, a 15th Century Indian "Bhakti" poet.

"Dagmarskvitha" ("Dagmar's Poem")

1. Grim, he comes the glad verse-smith
bringing gift from bright Queen of
Eastern lands. Lofty Marguerite
sends this skald with skein of words. [a poem]

2. Quick are poets to praise good Queens,
but laud not lesser sovereigns
outspoken on splendid deeds
But fawn not on false greatness –

3. we bear no bragging rulers,
great ones though we glad extol.
Sought have I the seat of wolves [Ealdormere thrones]
to free give flood-of-Odin. [Poetry]

4. I am here to heap praise on
Queen Dagmar. No dainty rose
this fair elm but feeds ravens [a woman]
with corpse-beer. Quickly she takes [blood]

5. up Gerð’s-fire to fierce defend [weaponry]
hearth and home. This Hild of gold [a woman]
bears a blade to bolster hosts
of Northlands noble warriors.

6. In peace time tireless she works
Serving kin and kingdom, her
speech polished, but plain spoken,
honest in all her doings.

7. Kind and warm, welcoming host,
joyful and generous too,
Great delight her laugh will give
to all who hear her mirth-speech. [laughter]

8.Most of all this elm of Hrist, [a woman]
splendidly inspires both men
and women to weapons bear,
to all flock to feed the wolves. [slay foes in battle]

9. Sir Wat she served as a squire,
belt of war she wears proudly,
now kingdom called her to serve,
take to brow the Trillium crown.

10. Thruð of day does so gladly [Thruð = valkyrie, Dagmar “Day Maid”]
Ne’er she leaves labor undone
With great joy she gives to all
the dream that dwells in her heart.

-- © 2010 Dan Marsh. Written in the Old Norse meter kvithuhattr by Grim the Skald, with deliberate references to Egil Skalagrimson's Arinbjornskvitha. Peformed for their Majesties Ealdormere Court at Pennsic 39.

"All Good Things End"

Snow drifts, troubles the dreams of stags.
Low frigid winds flay field of Lir.
Teasing the salt sea's tresses fair,
and feeding frost with bitter air.
Gone the blackberries of summer's sun.
Gone the green leaves of oak and ash.
All good things end.

King as warrior wielded blade.
King pursued salmon's wisdom too.
Sought others' strengths to stretch his own.
Patient patron who guarded throne.
Resolved to reward subject's deeds.
Resolved to design peace for East.
All good things end.

I stood ever in honor's place.
I witnessed feats of fearsome man.
Monarch inspired men to dream.
Endured like oak in battle's stream.
Why does night devour waning day?
Why does the fine frost cover East?
All good things end.

Night gnaws at dusk of Kingly reign.
Night sees last flare of falling star.
Wounds poet deeply this dimming light.
Let legacy's son shine as bright.
Bittersweet gift this sorrow song.
Bittersweet but bright hope for East.
All good things end.

-- © 2010 Amanda Lord (known in the society as Aoife inghean Conchobair) Written as a last gift for HRM Edward.

"The Summer Queen"

When summer comes the East prepares for war
and readies weapons. For the Pennsic fight
we look to kings to lead with tyger's roar
and queens inspire us all like roses bright.
Queen Marguerite was monarch fine and rare
and though possesses she great grace and poise
she’s not content to be mere symbol fair,
she gave the Eastern force her blade and voice.
She led us through the strife beside the king
and persevered regardless of travail
she proved that words can make the heart take wing
and showed courageous deeds can never fail.

Though queen no more she'll be when days will wane,
her deeds inspire us still when others reign.

-- © 2010 Dan Marsh (known in the society as Grim the Skald) Written as a last gift for HRM Marguerite. Written as a Shakesperian sonnet.

Progress

Part of Queen Marguerite's speech at GNEW

More Information


Personal tools